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Buck's 300 series has touched the hearts of many, it's tainted the memories of many a work day, and even a few fine days a field. There's something about those rugged slipjoints that gets to me, I don't know what exactly it is, but I love 'em. If you have a favorite 300, I would love to see it, or I'd like to just hear about it.

Here are mine.

[IMG]http://i1140.photobucket.com/albums/n574/Jtwoshoes/P1019363.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i1140.photobucket.com/albums/n574/Jtwoshoes/P1019107.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i1140.photobucket.com/albums/n574/Jtwoshoes/P1017573.jpg[/IMG]

 

Thanks

 

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Replies to This Discussion

Another hole in my 300 Series collection has now been filled. Just received this beat up #315 Yachtsman Marlin Spike, made by Camillus, probably in the '70's. This one has a few issues, spike won't lock, boogered handle pin with small cracks around it, very rusty carbon springs, but it does fill a gap in my collection, (and doesn't look so bad if you stand back and squint). On the good side, being slightly broken meant it didn't cost me that much, so I can console myself with that thought while I continue looking for a pristine one. Soon I hope to post a photo of a complete 300 Series collection, and this gets me closer to that goal. The search continues.

How do I pick a favorite?

I finally achieved a goal and managed to collect one of each model of the regular production 300 Series models made by Camillus for Buck between 1971 & 1985. The #321 Bird Knife was the last to arrive, and it completes this "basic" set. Below I posted the advertising photo I used for inspiration which shows and identifies each knife. I've placed my knives in the same position so you can identify them using that photo.

Of course there are numerous versions of many of these knives, different colors, handle materials, etc, but this is the basic set of models that were made by Camillus.

The search continues.

Here is a cutie that could qualify as my favorite 300, (at the moment at least). Buck #305 Clipper in Smooth Blue Delrin.

Here is my new "Favorite 300", a 1966 #301 Stockman. These and the #303 Cadet were the first offerings in the 300 Series that first year of the series, and they sported lined bolsters that single year only. This example is in pristine condition with factory sharp blades that show no signs of usage.

The 301, without a doubt. I like the easy opening; I never have to fight the knife to open it.
If we are allowed to mention them, I am also rather fond of the 371 Atockmans for much the same reasons (and for the different cover materials used) the 389 Canoe, and the large Trapper ised for the SMKW Bill Lowan "Fishing Knife" a couple years ago ... even with the fine serrations on the Wharncliff blade. (I am ***not*** a fan of serrated blades - not even on my bread knives.)

I agree about the #301, they always seem to work perfectly. As a 300 Series collector I'm thrilled to have one of the first versions of the series ever made. However, I prefer to spend my money on the US-made Bucks, but the import versions I have seen and held seem to be of very high quality, (#371 & #389 are imports). I have no problem with collecting import knives, I just prefer to collect the domestic varieties.

To me a serrated blade is something I like if it's on a rare and collectible knife. For example I know of at least one #317 Traiblazer from the 70's that was a salesman's sample that had a serrated secondary blade, they were apparently never sold to the public. A friend in the Buck Collectors Club has one, he sent me a photo, (I'm green with envy by the way). Due to it's rarity I would love to have one BECAUSE of the serrated blade, not because it might be a useful type of blade.

Steve said:

The 301, without a doubt. I like the easy opening; I never have to fight the knife to open it.
If we are allowed to mention them, I am also rather fond of the 371 Atockmans for much the same reasons (and for the different cover materials used) the 389 Canoe, and the large Trapper ised for the SMKW Bill Lowan "Fishing Knife" a couple years ago ... even with the fine serrations on the Wharncliff blade. (I am ***not*** a fan of serrated blades - not even on my bread knives.)

Sometimes you just have to do what is right, at least do what is right for an out of control Buck collector. Here is an unused 1990 Buck #312BB, (Buck Bone), NIB w/ papers. There just aren't that many of these out there, so when I saw this I had to give it a shot, ended up paying much less than I expected so I'm pretty happy about it. This one is going into the display case with my Buck SFO's.

I really like this era of Buck in-house production, the hollow blade grind is superb and the bone handles are awesome. I don't know why they changed things after 2000, but in my opinion that 1986-2000 era was their pinnacle.

Wow, nice find, Syd

Thanks Billy! Of all the frames in the 300 Series I like this "Mini Trapper" version the best, fits my hand perfectly.

Billy Oneale said:

Wow, nice find, Syd

What a find!  The info on the box tells me that knife would be a good fit here also!

Thanks Jan, yeah, that box would look good in the gun safe with all those other tubes & boxes, (btw: what info on the box are you referring to? Am I missing something?). I was only expecting the knife and the box, the paperwork, (including the evangelical tract by Al Buck), was a surprise bonus, and I am still delighted at how little I ended up paying for it. All I can say about that is thank goodness for newbie Ebay sellers with crappy cameras, otherwise I think it would have gone for much more.

Jan Carter said:

What a find!  The info on the box tells me that knife would be a good fit here also!

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