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I just discovered this bit of information.

"And a side note—a dead rattlesnake can still bite you long after it’s been squished on the highway. The bite reflex within the nervous system is still intact for several hours after the snake’s demise so don’t pick one up lusting after a cool snakeskin belt."

This is the source.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/health/medical/15-survival-myths-that-coul...

I wonder if it is true for other poisonous snakes?

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A snake wrangler was bitten by a rattler on the set of post-apocalyptic teen movie “The Maze Runner” while shooting in Louisiana.

Behave appropriately when hiking, climbing, walking. When in rattlesnake territory, think like a rattlesnake to keep your mind on how they might behave so that you can behave accordingly:

  • Always hike with at least one buddy. If you are alone and bitten, you will be in dire trouble. Carry a cell phone that works and alert family or friends of your intended hiking course and duration.
  • Stay out of the way. The easiest way to avoid rattlesnakes is to keep out of their way. Keep alert as you hike, walk, and climb. Stick to well-used trails and do not wander off into tall grass, underbrush and weeds where rattlesnakes may be hiding.
  • Do not stick your hands in the wrong places. Don't stick your hands down holes, under rocks and ledges or even into brush when you are walking around. These are key hiding places for rattlesnakes. When hiking, it is best to carry a sturdy staff, or at least a long, sturdy and light stick, to help prevent using your hands in areas where snakes may hide.
  • Don't sit down on tree stumps or logs without first checking inside. You might just be sitting on a rattlesnake....
  • Step on and not over. When you need to cross logs and rocks, it is sensible to step on the objects rather than straight over them. This way, you can spot a rattlesnake that may be sheltering under it and can take evasive action quickly.
  • Look before you leap. Take care where you land your feet. A foot coming straight down next to, or on top of a snake is asking for a bite. Snakes rely on vibration to hear and while they can sense you coming if you have stomped about loudly enough, they cannot deal with removing themselves fast enough if you blaze up a trail quickly and provide little warning of your approach.
  • When walking, carry a stick, and whack bushes and undergrowth a bit before you walk on/near them, and snakes will get away. They'll go under bushes or thick grass immediately, so don't put your feet in/on those places! If you must step on those hiding places, probe them a bit first with your stick, so the snake has a chance to get away.
  • Move out of the way. If you do walk into the range of a rattlesnake, calmly back off as quickly and quietly as you can.
  • Take care around water. Rattlesnakes can swim. Anything resembling a long stick might be a rattlesnake.
  • Do not provoke a rattlesnake. Angering a snake will result in one response — you become its target. Remember — a snake is defending itself from attack in such a case and if you poke it with sticks, throw stones at it, kick at it or do silly little jigs around it, you are asking for trouble. And worse still, there may well be a difference in the venom between an angered rattlesnake and one reacting quickly in self-defence — the toxicity may be increased, whereas a surprised rattlesnake may only bite without injecting venom (possible, not certain). Whatever the strength of the venom, an angered rattlesnake will be more likely to keep striking.
  • Leave the snake alone. Many people are bitten in the process of trying to heroically rid the world of one more bothersome snake. Apart from the snake not being bothersome, the snake is going to bite you to try and defend itself. Live and let live — back off and let it have its space to slither away. And be warned — there is a reason for the saying "as mad as a cut snake" — an injured snake is a very, very dangerous foe.

Best to use a shovel and place the road kill out of harms way. Thats good advice Jan, although copperheads and rattlesnkes just seem to lose their heads on the farm.....so to speak...

Hey I respect Carls view but I am a kill 'em all kinda gal.  That goes for the 8 legged ones too!

I'm not necessarily a kill em all kinda  guy but all poisonous and any I don't know aren't poisonous I will kill if I can.


Jan Carter said:

Hey I respect Carls view but I am a kill 'em all kinda gal.  That goes for the 8 legged ones too!

A good walking stick/staff is way more important than a handgun or longgun for snakes, (and you are not as likely to shoot your foot off. Heavy walking and thumping the stick on the ground as you walk alerts the snake(s) to take cover or flee. They cannot hear you shout or scream. Just remember they cannot "jump", fly or run and they can only strike 1/3 their body length if fully coiled and ready, so just give them room. Some get curious and/or confused and may move toward you but they do not intentionally chase things bigger than they are.

It's best to just stay alert, know what to look for as Jan's post list mentions, and don't be stupid. Mutual respect for all wild creatures is the best preventive action.

Save your ammunition for the two legged predator - way more dangerous than anything in the wild.

Carl, I agree totally with you on the two legged predators!  That is why I am always armed whether I am in the wilds of Walmart or the woods!

Carl Rechsteiner said:

A good walking stick/staff is way more important than a handgun or longgun for snakes, (and you are not as likely to shoot your foot off. Heavy walking and thumping the stick on the ground as you walk alerts the snake(s) to take cover or flee. They cannot hear you shout or scream. Just remember they cannot "jump", fly or run and they can only strike 1/3 their body length if fully coiled and ready, so just give them room. Some get curious and/or confused and may move toward you but they do not intentionally chase things bigger than they are.

It's best to just stay alert, know what to look for as Jan's post list mentions, and don't be stupid. Mutual respect for all wild creatures is the best preventive action.

Save your ammunition for the two legged predator - way more dangerous than anything in the wild.

Thought this was a good place to share someones idea for trapping snakes when they are in your yard

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/515899/best-way-ive-found-yet-to-...

I'm not sure that would work if the snakes in your yard are these Burmese pythons!

Hunting Forum

Jan Carter said:

Thought this was a good place to share someones idea for trapping snakes when they are in your yard

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/515899/best-way-ive-found-yet-to-...

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