/>

         WELCOME HOME !
What books would you recommend to someone if they talked to you about survival?

Tags: books, survival

Views: 836

Replies to This Discussion

Bushcraft: Outdoor Skills and Wilderness Survival
by: Mors Kochanski

Essential Bushcraft

by: Ray Mears

Wildwood Wisdom

by: Ellsworth Jaeger, Lloyd Kahn
All excellent books for survival and bushcraft.
Thanks for that Chris, I think it would be important to have a reference point of books here in this group that would make good reads for anyone interested. I've heard of a book called The Survival Zombie but don't know much about it.

The Ultimate Guide To Wilderness Living

Wilderness Living & Survival Skills : by John & Geri McPherson

 

FM - 2176 SURVIVAL : by Department  of Defense

 

Primitive Technology I - Ancestral Skills

Primitive Technology II - A Book Of Earth Skills : by The Society Of Primitive Tecnology

 

Earth Knack : by Bart & Robin Blankenship

 

Encyclopedia Of Survival Techniques : by Alexander Stillwell

That one you mentioned is a good one I have Clarence. That Primitive Technology I and II look interesting!

Clarence S. Carlton IV said:

The Ultimate Guide To Wilderness Living

Wilderness Living & Survival Skills : by John & Geri McPherson

 

Hi Steve! How about "SAS Survival Handbook" by John "Lofty" Wiseman? "How to Survive in the Wild, in Any Climate, on Land or at Sea"  Theres a lot to choose from on the subject. I have no idea which is best? 
Hi Kent, thanks for the suggestions any book authored by John "Lofty" Wiseman sounds like a must read!  There really are a ton of book out there. everybody seems to have there own take on it.  You know I joined the group just to see whats going on and find myself fascinated by it! There is a lot of great stuff on survival.

KENT GABLE said:
Hi Steve! How about "SAS Survival Handbook" by John "Lofty" Wiseman? "How to Survive in the Wild, in Any Climate, on Land or at Sea"  Theres a lot to choose from on the subject. I have no idea which is best?

Steve-Sometimes I think survival against the elements is something people actually wish to experience simply to see if they're man (or woman) enough to take on Mother Nature? Bad camping experiences and just living in north FL has taught me to  prepare for the worst.

 I have a survival kit that I sometimes keep on my boat which I hope I never have to use and I also carry a few necessities on my possesion that would keep me from being completely miserable as opposed to comparatively miserable. A reliable knife, leatherman tool (the cheap, small one) insect repellent, small space blanket, 10' of parachord, matches in a waterproof container w/ whistle & a fire steel & scraper www.SurvivalTopics.com  along with a film canister with cotton balls impregnated with vasiline (for when the waterproof container fails. A little fish'n line & hooks, 2 bandaids, a bandana & compass along with some water &  candy or crackers can make that difference. Remember. You need to keep this stuff on you in case you get separated from your survival kit which shouldn't weigh more than 8 lbs. Frankly, I hope I never need this stuff but spending a night or two in the wild is a good way to figure out what you need to survive? "Nessbuck", I ain't!

Thanks for the info Kent, I like those tips and I agree its part of the fun, the test, to see if you can do it. I still look forward to the few times a year I can go camping, even though I live pretty rural now. Its great fun to get out in the woods and just live for a few days like my ancestors did, in the elements!

Steve- sometimes, just being alone with nature & our Creator is essential for our mental well being. I like to go out on my  fishin' boat and I don't even care if I catch anything,  just so I can get away from my small town in N.E. FL and people. To commune with nature, watch for gators, birds, deer and forget about civilization for a spell.

I especially love the Ockalawaha River as rivers are scenic corridors. Sometimes I'll take someone special along  just to show them how wonderful & relaxing it can be.

Next Oct., I'll take my only son out there. He's going to be 43 and lives up in the Chicago area so we don't get to see each other often enough and just be together &  talk. I have a wonderful granddaughter who will soon be 12 but this will be an opportunity for just the two of us to camp out & fish. Maybe even do a little hunting although neither of us have ever done that before.  We are both really looking  forward to some "west an weckweation at wast!" as Elmer Fudd used to say,  in our favorite place-the outdoors.

I've done a lot of traveling in my time and whether it's Alaska, Canada, the desert or the swamps here in FL, each has their own special environment & magic. We won't be back packing this time -just "sissy camping"  with all the comforts (except electricity) and a nice big tent with cots mainly for my arthritic back. Got to have a fire though, even if it's hot.

Naturally I'll have to wear my Randall Small Camp Knife even though some folks would be mortified at actually using such a beautiful "investment" when I could just as easily use my Buck Special 119. What good is having something I've always wanted and not use it?  I'll also be carrying my trusty everyday Buck Stockman too.  A good knife is absolutely essential and the most important piece of "survival" equipment a person could ever need.  A good axe is important as well, especially in the far North. Down here in a sub tropical climate, a decent machete is always carried on my boat along with that all  important survival kit which deep down inside, we all know I'd just love to have a chance to use,  just to prove that I'm just as tough as my ancestors. Har!  That, of course is a joke as they'd probably laugh themselves to death at my feeble efforts to survive with it long before Mother Nature would claim them. One never conquers nature, at best merely coexist with it.

I truly hope future generations get to experience true wilderness which is no longer  abundant down here in the "Lower 48" as the Alaskans & Canucks refer to America.  At least long enough to admire it's vastness and long enough  to put down whatever button pushing gizmo they're normally preoccupied with?

It's essential for their well being to experience the Great Spirit's Happy Hunting Ground and an absolute necessity for me.

 

Kent, you are so right there. It really sounds like a great time, I mean getting out with your son or grand daughter to experience outdoors. As much as I use the internet, it does drive me nuts to see kids just using technology with no regard to the "real world'. There is so much to see and do outside. If I could I'd spend all my time hiking, hunting, surviving outside. We have campgrounds near the farm and sometimes we get people that will hike through and they are fascinated by the animals and all the stuff we do here. I think many just don't get the chance to see how a farm works.

You'll have to let us know how the visit goes and how well the knives hold up for you.  Hope you get good weather!

Bane, Michael -- Trail Safe: Averting Threatening Human Behavior In The Outdoors
Fitzhenry & Whiteside Pub, -- Northern Survival
Kochanski, Mors -- Northern Bush Craft
Paladin Press, -- Never Say Die: The Canadian Air Force Survival Manual
Great stuff there Shlomo, The Canadian Air Force Survival Manual that has to be a must read! Thanks for posting.

Shlomo ben Maved said:
Bane, Michael -- Trail Safe: Averting Threatening Human Behavior In The Outdoors
Fitzhenry & Whiteside Pub, -- Northern Survival
Kochanski, Mors -- Northern Bush Craft
Paladin Press, -- Never Say Die: The Canadian Air Force Survival Manual

RSS

White River Knives

Reed Cutlery Company

Visit Lee' s Cutlery

click to visit

SHOP TSA KNIVES

Now Available

KNIFE NEWS!!!

Click to view more

JSR Sports!

NEW

© 2017   Created by Jan Carter.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service