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I have always had a love for fixed blade knives and enjoy carrying them while hunting , fishing and camping. Everywhere I go, I see less and less people carrying fixed blades. I decided to start asking people why they carried a folder instead of a fixed blade. The answer was almost always the same, "They get in my way". I started trying to look at fixed fixed blades from this stand point. I soon realized that it wasn't the knife but the sheath that caused it to get in the way. Most knife makers and knife companies make sheaths with the snap holding style or the fold over pouch style. Both of which hang very low on the hip, causing it to get in the way. Ahh...Here enters the stitch around style sheath, because of its design it rides much higher and less likely to get in the way. I think that if more people would try the stitch around sheath for their fixed blades, they would use and enjoy them more. I have three fixed blades that I use most of the time and have had to have new stitch around sheaths made for them. I think you should consider this style sheath for your fixed blade. Knife makers, if you want to sell more knives make it easier for your customer to use them. Just the thougths of an old CAJUN.

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Good point, and your comparison pix really make your case. How about some shown from the belt side, both types carefully aligned for belt position?

One thing I'd like to see is a better "clip" or "paddle" type sheath. I have both belt loop and paddle type holsters for all my side arms, because sometimes, like at the court house, I need to be able to take it off my belt without "dropping trousers". I've never seen a paddle knife sheath.
Andy...I have been thinking about how to answer your reply for a few days now and have come up with this. Alot of knife makers have dropped the ball when it comes their sheaths, either in style or usefullness. There are a few that do a great job with there sheaths but for the majority they need to work on it. Also if you have a pretty ole Gal why would you want to have just one dress for her to wear.
I make 2 type sof sheaths. One has a large (more than 2") belt loop that allows one to shift/tilt the sheath when in awkward positions or while driving. The other has a combination loop/boot clip. One can either string it on yer belt or clip it on the belt or boottop. As I'm a manly footwaer type of guy I almost always have it stuck to my boot top.
When I was a kid,we used to slide the sheath up our belts around to where your back pocket is.Then just tuck the sheath in our pocket.Now they'll get you for a concealed weapon for doing that.All depends on where you live I reckon.
Jim Johnson
Depending on the blade length, sometimes a horizontal carry might snug up the knife out of the way. Although I've stitched some sheaths for myself in the past, I prefer to let those with better skills do it for me. A pricey, but top quality place one might want to look into would be Hedgehog Leatherworks @ http://www.hedgehogleatherworks.com/
Rob certainly has made a good point. Fixed blade knives in sheaths usually do get in the way. I have been collecting knives for more than 50 years, and have been making knives for about the last nine. I make the sheath for each knife. When I first started, I made the old standard style sheath --- one piece of "front" leather sewn onto a back piece with a belt loop and a snap-type strap across the handle. I gradually recognized that a sheath should serve two purposes: (1) provide a convenient, safe way to carry the knife on your person and (2) complement the knife in terms of overall looks. Neither the traditional snap-strap sheath nor the typical "pouch" style that seems to be so much in vogue today meet criteria number 1. Why? The snap strap, which is designed to hold the handle tight against the sheath and keep the knife securely in the sheath, gets in the way when you are drawing the knife, and even worse when you try to put the knife back in the sheath. This style sheath also jams into your car seat (or sofa) when you sit down, usually resulting in the hilt of the knife jabbing you in your bottom rib. The Pouch style (yes, Rob, including your stitch-around style) normally covers so much of the handle that you can only use your thumb and forefinger to draw the knife and put it back (not very safe and almost no control). What's more, the Pouch style rides so high that it requires a difficult, almost contortionist, motion to draw and return the knife. Rob's photos show both of these sheath styles. The horizontal sheath solves the problem of the sheath getting in your way, but makes drawing the knife difficult, unless you use a cross draw (wear on left side and draw with right hand), and, unless certain features are added, increases the risk of the knife falling out. So what is the answer?

This is my first attempt to Reply (new member). I'm going to "post" it and see if I got the mechanics of this Club correct then, if anyone is interested, I will show the evolution of the best (that I have designed to date) type of fixed blade sheath.
I carry a fixed blade 6.67 of 7 days a week.I usually have a blade length of 3 to 6 in. long.I carry these knives with a merc-harness rig.It is adjustable easily for different sheaths and sizes.I call it the "Secret Agent Style" carry mode.As a bike rider and adventurer,I find myself needing access to my sheath knife in the sitting,standing,crouching,and lying positions at different times.I can grab the knife suspended from my left side and a snap doesn't bother me.Usually I have tactical styled knives not fancy stuff.Another way that is good for me is the horizontal carry style.Even with a 7-8 inch blade size,and me a whopping 150 lbs. I can carry a Recon Tanto on my belt lashed with some paracord.No disrespect meant to those who carry fancy fixed blades by the way.
Lets see some of the sheaths that go with y'all favorite fixed blade.

Great discussion, I am with Robert...can we see some?  Since I rarley carry a fixed I wont be much help here but I have heard many people complain that their fixed are not a convienient to carry as the folders.

John, Welcome and great starter discussion.  We would love to see that evolution.  Let us know if you need some help with the mechanics.

I have had new sheaths made for my fixed blades. You can get a custom sheath with all kinds of options for an old friend, that great fixed blade you love.

New to this group too, and I carry a fixed blade daily in a pouch style sheath.As a custom sheathmaker as well,I have had a chance to work not only with many other makers knives but knives from users and collectors.So that leaves me with making many styles pouch,flat,horizontal and crossdraws,etc. as a custom maker I ask the customer how they want to wear the knife, high,low,whatever and then see how that will fit the knife and sheath design.I make many of my pouch styles fairly high riding, as being in Florida ,many customers like to EDC fixed blades.Most custom makers can be flexible with design if they want to and with in reason.To comment on a remark made earlier about pouch sheath covering too much  of the knife, I was mentored by Sandy Morrissey, a Master Leathersmith with over sixty years of playing with leather.I was always taught safety first, and for knife retention and protection to both the knife and the user to use the two-three finger rule for setting on how much of the knife is exposed. I continue to do this and with few exceptions will I change.I love high end pretty sheaths but functional and safe comes first.

As a custom maker I get asked to make alot of strange things, but being this a fixed blade group,I think you all would like this.My buddy Alan Folts made this blade called the "WMD" and asked me to sheath it, and the sheath had to swivel forward.Enjoy.Dave

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There is a somewhat easy solution to having your knife stab you in the ribs when sitting--other then getting a shorter knife and that’s to move it higher up on your body...Who says that the belt sheath has to be on a belt attached to your pants...Just ask all those soldiers who attached their knives to the straps of their pistol harness (belt suspenders) usually in the butt down position.

Here we are required by law to wear a white over suit with a blaze orange vest and/or hat when big game hunting...I use painters coveralls and as we all know aren't the easiest things to take off when "nature calls" or to get access to anything worn next to the skin, like jacket or pants pockets.

To ease the matter somewhat, I got hold of three, seventy two inch leather boot laces and wove them together to form a belt that I wear over the thin clothing and the heavier clothing and then the parka (all under the coveralls) that we wear here since deer season is usually when it's -10F+. Attached to this belt is a fire bag (matches, lighter, flint & steel, tinder, char cloth etc.) that makes lighting a small coffee or lunch fire easier and of course my knife sheath and I wear this mostly above the natural waistline so even large knives (which I don't ever use for hunting) can be worn comfortably.

A.G. Russell has a very unique system with the Kydex sheaths of his Deer Hunter & Bird & Trout knives which uses a metal chain and clip that you attach to the belt loop on your trousers that swivels naturally when you move and bend out of the way when sitting…The Saami peoples of Northern Europe—Scandinavia have been using this method for their puukkos and leuku knives for centuries just using leather thongs instead of metal chain…I have both and the method works great just not with really heavy Bowie knives unless they beef up the chain a lot!

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