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Doesn't matter if you call it a Camp, Picnic, Outing, Campaign, or Dining Tool.   This discussion is a place to show off your knives that have a spoon and/or a fork.  Today, most people call these knives Hobos!  Let's see a few!

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Freddie the Freeloader. He was evidently amazed at the possibilities of his "Hobo" knife. He has that piece of string tied to his little finger. Typically, He always knew why it was there. "To remind me of something." I don't remember what it was. If I did, I wouldn't need the string." 

Well, I only have these Case XX Trapper Hobos. Jigged Red bone and a Fabulous Stag. I had to post an additional pic of the Stag slabs.

Nice Brad. I use to watch ole Freddie all the time.

Those are some really nice Hobos, Brad.  I love those stag slabs!

Speaking of names for Hobo's. My grand father called his a "lunch Tool". He said there wasn't many places to eat, so you had to bring your own food, when you went somewhere. They used a Hobo or you had to eat your lunch with your fingers. The Great Depression and WWII were hard on a lot of people.

A lot of cans were opened with Barlows and the like during those years. For a long time, I would feed my cats a daily treat of canned food, before pop top cans came in. I always used my EDC Gerber bolt lock. After an estimated 700+ cans, and many more years of daily use around saltwater, it wore down past the hardened edge and I retired it. Now, they command a high price, if you can find one at all.

Robert Burris said:

Speaking of names for Hobo's. My grand father called his a "lunch Tool". He said there wasn't many places to eat, so you had to bring your own food, when you went somewhere. They used a Hobo or you had to eat your lunch with your fingers. The Great Depression and WWII were hard on a lot of people.

The Coleman Hobo will never gain in value but it is a solid come apart camp utensil. At around $10 it looks nice and  you're not going to feel bad when you clean it with sand and boiling water.  The fork is a tad small but overall I've been impressed by this  inexpensive made in China knife.  A hobo and Hobo could actually afford!

For some reason this hobo with its clean lines and art-deco look makes me all fuzzy. I wish more custom makers would make this style, even if it involved adapting some quality utensils. And, what is wrong with recycling to reduce labor and expense to offer a less expensive products? You can be sure that the makers in China use these utensils for dinnerware as well.

Tobias Gibson said:

The Coleman Hobo will never gain in value but it is a solid come apart camp utensil. At around $10 it looks nice and  you're not going to feel bad when you clean it with sand and boiling water.  The fork is a tad small but overall I've been impressed by this  inexpensive made in China knife.  A hobo and Hobo could actually afford!

I bought an Ozark Trails Hobo Knife about three years ago.  I think it cost around $5.  This was the Walmart brand of the 4.75 inch (12 CM) six implement Hobo that is the modern day equal to all those Big Honkin' Japanese numbers from the 1950s and 1960s.  I have definitely gotten my $5 worth out of the knife.  Sure it is a heavy junk knife but its been three years!  A billion times better than the piece of crap "Royal Crest" Eating Utensil which began falling apart as soon as i opened the box!

I have two of those Ozark Trails. I used one a few years and then one day in Walmart they were on sale for $3.50, I couldn't help myself, I bought another one.

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