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Well I have studied and kicked around which knife sharpening system I  wanted to invest in!  I after much research have went with the KME system with diamond stones.  I was ready to go with the wicked edge system, which I know is a top of the line set up, but the using both hands was really putting me off.  I prefer to use my dominate hand in tasks that involve control and sharp objects.  The KME comes in a nice carry case, with three diamond stones 300, 600, 1500 grit.  My first knife was a old beat up frost with surgical steel blade.  I re profiled the blade at 20* and it is hair spiting sharp for sure.  Next I worked over a Queen Plainsman at the same angle, it took no time as the angle was close to what it already had on it.  The Queen is scary sharp!!  I am very satisfied and at half the cost of the wicked edge I think this system is a good bargain.  My video review is below along with some pics.  Enjoy!!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2_FAgsNMmao

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4_sZvKTPTHY

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I have a jeweler's eye loupe, and also have a swing arm lighted magnifying lamp that I use to read tang stamps and do small electronics work, but I still let my thumb determine whether a knife has an edge to it or not. That's just me. If I started examining edges that closely I'd get uber-anal about it and would probably never finish a sharpening. However, that being said, that's just me. My brother and I used to go around with part of the hair on our arms shaved off all the time because that's how we tested the edges of our blades, so we didn't need to "see" the edges to know our blades were sufficiently sharp. We figured if it will shave then it had a good enough edge to use, then went back to work. I don't check my edges that way anymore, I just use my thumb, but again....that's just me!.

However, I'm sure that your edges are most likely pristine and beautiful under magnification compared to mine. I've always viewed a knife as just another tool, get it sharp enough to perform it's function, then go back to work using it. If I had more valuable collector knives that I wanted to display and keep pristine I might be more careful with them. Even though I have some old, very collectible knives, I still see them as tools and use them accordingly.

However, If you are using a machine, eye loupe, or both to sharpen yet preserve a valuable collectible then I say go for it. I'm just an old technician set in his ways, and those ways work for me, that doesn't mean they will work for anyone else.



Syd Carr said:

I have a jeweler's eye loupe, and also have a swing arm lighted magnifying lamp that I use to read tang stamps and do small electronics work, but I still let my thumb determine whether a knife has an edge to it or not. That's just me. If I started examining edges that closely I'd get uber-anal about it and would probably never finish a sharpening. However, that being said, that's just me. My brother and I used to go around with part of the hair on our arms shaved off all the time because that's how we tested the edges of our blades, so we didn't need to "see" the edges to know our blades were sufficiently sharp. We figured if it will shave then it had a good enough edge to use, then went back to work. I don't check my edges that way anymore, I just use my thumb, but again....that's just me!.

However, I'm sure that your edges are most likely pristine and beautiful under magnification compared to mine. I've always viewed a knife as just another tool, get it sharp enough to perform it's function, then go back to work using it. If I had more valuable collector knives that I wanted to display and keep pristine I might be more careful with them. Even though I have some old, very collectible knives, I still see them as tools and use them accordingly.

However, If you are using a machine, eye loupe, or both to sharpen yet preserve a valuable collectible then I say go for it. I'm just an old technician set in his ways, and those ways work for me, that doesn't mean they will work for anyone else.

Syd , I think you are correct if it shaves it is sharp enough ! However having spent an inordinate amount of money on an Edge Pro system and having now become a" knife collector " rather than just an old fellow who has a pocket knife , I have been overcome with enthusiasm .  I never did trust enthusiasm and look where it has got me . I am on the verge of getting an angle cube and horribly close to a USB microscope .

See you can't trust enthusiasm !!

Ha, I hear you.

I'm sure if I had an Edge Pro I would soon be out of control, giddy with thoughts of safely, automatically sharpening everything in sight. I'm a collector in the sense that I cannot stop buying pocket knives, and can't stop prowling swap meets, (& yard sales, estate sales, thrift stores, etc, etc). The kinds of knives I usually come up with don't deserve such luxuries as an Edge Pro. Of course I have some very nice knives, some very old and relatively collectible, but none valuable enough for me to worry about ruining them with a botched sharpening job, (I just DON'T botch sharpening jobs though...if I did my Dad would come back form the dead and thunk my head). I'd rather put the money an Edge Pro would cost me and go out and find another old Buck, Case or some other old knife. Fact is I don't use my knives for cutting as often as I used to, and don't need to sharpen them as much, (though I carry several every day), so my sharpening needs have diminished. However, if I were more of a "hobbyist" about knives and not so much just an old junker, I would probably insist on having an Edge Pro.

Good trick for detecting the if you got a good burr is to place a small piece of paper towel between your finger and the blade and slowly drag away the paper will grab a burr. 

This came in today, 4 micron diamond liquid and a kangaroo strop mounted to a steel plate.  This set up makes a knife, well the only way to describe it is "stupid sharp".  I think Steve said it best this is for when you just wanna show off!!

LOL, one bare arm is how you can tell if someone is a knife nut

hey!  Great tip!

Brian Martin said:

Good trick for detecting the if you got a good burr is to place a small piece of paper towel between your finger and the blade and slowly drag away the paper will grab a burr. 

I bought this sharpening setup at the Oregon Knife Show in April and it really is a great kit especially for the price.  It's like the Rolls Royce of Lansky style sharpening setups.  I bought this same kit along with the base, an extra course 140 grit stone and the pen blade jaws for $180.  If you don't have the pen blade jaws and do many small traditional blades then it's a must.  With the pen blade jaws you can sharpen the tiny blade on a Victorinox Classic down to 17 degrees which is pretty impressive.  

Good to hear Jake, how have your stones held up? I am loving mine!

 I like the basic idea of the kme with the angle adjustment that is less likely to move. i don't like the fact that it still needs to evolve more to be able to do the whole blade without running into the clamp. yes. i realize that will not be a problem with all knives/angles. 

i check my edge by seeing if the edge will hang on my nail. that's how my teacher showed me to check combat flesh eaters. :) So, as soon as i get a knife i check the edge like that to know how consistently sharp the edge is.

The new model Anthony has a lower profile clamp that has sharpened the smallest pen blades I have tried, every new kit ships with the redesigned head.   Unless I am missing what you are talking about.

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