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So you got the bug? Can't stop reading about knives? Can't stop buying those knives?

What in the world got you started?

Tags: addiction, collecting, hobby, knife, start

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I hear ya.  I bought two 50th anniversaries this year.

  It might sound funny, but I sold knives at flea markets and on the internet for years. They were as expected mostly cheap China/Pakistan knives but it got me re-interested in other ,more collectable knives. It made me think back to when I was a kid living in the coal mining camps of southwestern Virginia. My Dad was a coal miner and he always carried a pocketknife . Usually a Barlow knife and to me it seemed a part of him. He passed away in January and after almost a year, I still remember how he loved his Barlow. Even almost a year later I still think of that. He was a Navy man in WWII, and today he would be watching the Army/Navy game and twirling his knife between his fingers.   I remember as a six year old kid getting a small knife for Xmas one year and how I treasured it. Many hours playing mumbly peg with my friends or fishing and playing in the mountains, and always relying on the little knife whether fighting imaginary Indians or whittling toy guns etc...kept a place in my heart for that little knife.I don't even remember what brand it was , and to me that seems just wrong.  I don't know exactly why I started collecting, but to me it is a great feeling just to hold a vintage knife and wonder what kind of life it had. It is more than just a tool to me. Knives and knife makers are a part of us and for me it truly is in my blood.

We're glad you found us, David.

For me, it was my interest in the military and the WWII era. Started buying at gun shows and then over the internet. Soon, it was almost an obsession. I would collect one and then another in better condition to replace the earlier purchase. Only thing was, I never divested myself of the previous acquisition. My wife understood and allowed the preoccupation with these beautiful and useful pieces of times past.

Now I have fighting knives and bayonets crowding boxes and closets. Time for me to break them up and move them to younger collectors to enjoy and preserve the history. Already sold many, but the process is very slow. I pick one up and begin to photograph it and then lay it down only to decide that "I'll wait to sell that one later". Then later again. I am thinking that many of you understand this process (or lack of it).

If I can get myself motivated, I'll begin the procedure again soon. Maybe. . .

Got to have extras, Mario.

Then you have to get a spare or two, just in case...

Right on, J.J.. A kindred spirit. You get it!

J.J. Smith III said:

Got to have extras, Mario.

Then you have to get a spare or two, just in case...

David,

The pocket knives had you hooked before you even knew it!  Being able to picture your dad, watching the game and twirling his knife is the most precious of memories, I hope you enjoy that memory with a barlow in your hand for every Army/Navy game to come.  It may inspire someone else to carry that memory with them

David Mullins said:

  It might sound funny, but I sold knives at flea markets and on the internet for years. They were as expected mostly cheap China/Pakistan knives but it got me re-interested in other ,more collectable knives. It made me think back to when I was a kid living in the coal mining camps of southwestern Virginia. My Dad was a coal miner and he always carried a pocketknife . Usually a Barlow knife and to me it seemed a part of him. He passed away in January and after almost a year, I still remember how he loved his Barlow. Even almost a year later I still think of that. He was a Navy man in WWII, and today he would be watching the Army/Navy game and twirling his knife between his fingers.   I remember as a six year old kid getting a small knife for Xmas one year and how I treasured it. Many hours playing mumbly peg with my friends or fishing and playing in the mountains, and always relying on the little knife whether fighting imaginary Indians or whittling toy guns etc...kept a place in my heart for that little knife.I don't even remember what brand it was , and to me that seems just wrong.  I don't know exactly why I started collecting, but to me it is a great feeling just to hold a vintage knife and wonder what kind of life it had. It is more than just a tool to me. Knives and knife makers are a part of us and for me it truly is in my blood.

Mario,

This year I thinned a few also and it is a very hard process.  Kudo's that your wife understood and appreciated what collecting them meant to you

Mario Rossetti said:

For me, it was my interest in the military and the WWII era. Started buying at gun shows and then over the internet. Soon, it was almost an obsession. I would collect one and then another in better condition to replace the earlier purchase. Only thing was, I never divested myself of the previous acquisition. My wife understood and allowed the preoccupation with these beautiful and useful pieces of times past.

Now I have fighting knives and bayonets crowding boxes and closets. Time for me to break them up and move them to younger collectors to enjoy and preserve the history. Already sold many, but the process is very slow. I pick one up and begin to photograph it and then lay it down only to decide that "I'll wait to sell that one later". Then later again. I am thinking that many of you understand this process (or lack of it).

If I can get myself motivated, I'll begin the procedure again soon. Maybe. . .

Well for me, it was sort of by accident. I grew up on a dairy farm where I used knives as far back as I can remember, though they were considered tools rather than collectibles back then, but that's not to say a nice knife wasn't appreciated during those years. Many years later, my Uncle was looking for a specific, old Boker knife and I had discovered ebay at about the same time. I finally found what he was looking for and also found out that I was officially hooked. I have thoroughly enjoyed chasing the old H. Bokers around ever since. I have found knife collecting to be a great hobby/history lesson enjoyed by some truly nice folks.

I've had an interest in knives as far back as I can remember, but never really bought any after my early ten age years. Jump about 35 years to me having two boys, one about 14 and the other 12. I was taking my oldest fishing and he noticed a knife I had in my tackle box, nothing special, I think I paid 10 bucks for it at SMKW actually. Anyway...my son asks if he can have it, I don't know that I ever really told him yes or no but he ended up with it. This is actually what started him collecting. He started lookin into "neat and cool" looking knives and then finally ran into some Case knives. His passion for Case grew like a wild fire, he couldn't read enough about them and quickly amassed a little collection of some really nice Case knives. I took notice of his passion and helped him here and there but still didn't get too involved in it. A couple of years went by and he was already involved with the Case Collectors Club and on the knife forum there as well. It was time for the Case Collectors Reunion in Norris, Tennessee and he was determined to go. Well, I got the privilege to take him and let me tell you, the experience was like a light switch to me and my knife passion. The knives I saw, the comradary I experienced was priceless. I picked up a couple of knives and we went home. I didn't dive deep into collecting yet though, just mild purchase and interest. That fall we went to another Case event and I bought a few more knives, then the next year a couple of more events and more knives. This went on for a couple of years and then it hit me....man I want these knives and man do they look and feel awesome. 2016 was definitely the turn for me. I've joined the Case Collectors Club, found this awesome family forged in steel in the IKC!

There are 2 things that I love about knife collecting, the time I spend with my son and the hunt for that next blade.

Sorry to ramble, thanks for reading.
Great stories, all.
We're all different in our beginnings, but I'm certainly glad they brought us all together here.

I owned a buck 110 from the early 70s' i looked it up in Bing and found that these knives were valuable that started the whole thing. Actually it began at a K-mart in norwalk, ct. thay had these shrade old timers and uncle henrys on sale really cheap i bought as many as i had money for at the time they were all in those white sleeve boxes brand new from there my minor collection is history

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