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Am I alone or has anyone else considered bikes (as in the ones with pedals) as part of their survival kit?  While they do have limitations, they don't run out of gas, are quiet, and are easy to conceal.  Plus fixing  a flat on a bike is much easier than fixing one on a car. I'll need to take pics of the bike that I'm preparing for dooms-day.

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I apologize for hijacking Tobias' bicycle survival blog.  I took a look and found an interesting load carrying bicycle.  The Bullitt Bicycle:

Here is another bicycle option that will allow for greater flexibility in load carrying with trike wheels.  I like this one, and maybe it wouldn't be too difficult to adapt a two-man bicycle to this "trike" for increased power, although this "trike" is listed as an "electricbike" - www.electricbike.com.

No need to apologize, Howard; the concept is the same.  The thread is discussing the use of an man powered wheeled vehicle to improve travel or load bearing.  Man powered cycles are used world wide for transportation of personnel and cargo. You see less of it in areas with a more developed or robust economy. 

Hahahahaha.  I hope that first guy is hauling styrofoam.

Aha!  A Can-AM style bicycle.  More stable turning, plus front end load carrying as well as a following trailer.  Still needs another "driver" for really heavy loads, but I like it.  Requires all travelers in the group to have one or the guy on the bike will get way ahead of those walking along - until the next uphill grade.

I think I like this one because if you then have another regular bike you can transfer the rear load and trade off being the pushing or pulling a load.  LOL, I am suggesting you walk the whole mess up the hill 

Part II.  I hope that Jan's addition is made from PVC or Titanium pipe.  If it's steel pipe, I don't think I could move it even empty.

The plus side of bikes is they can be used to carry the load while you walk along side.  This was often the case on part of the ho chi mihn trail. The bike wasn't actually rode as much as pushed along allowing heavy weights to be moved easily by one person.  Replace the handle bars with a broom stick or a bamboo pole and you can move a 75mm pack howitzer with bicycles.  All you need is some rope and imagination. 

Fantastic, Tobias!  Makes great sense.  A long enough, and sturdy enough bar allows several people to push it along.

Tobias Gibson said:

The plus side of bikes is they can be used to carry the load while you walk along side.  This was often the case on part of the ho chi mihn trail. The bike wasn't actually rode as much as pushed along allowing heavy weights to be moved easily by one person.  Replace the handle bars with a broom stick or a bamboo pole and you can move a 75mm pack howitzer with a bicycle.  All you need is some rope and imagination.  Use a second bike to haul the ammunition.

Some observations on the Cargo Trike that Jan posted.

First: looking at the handlebars; there is no shift lever, therefore this is a single speed rig.

Second: again looking at the handlebars; there is no brake lever, therefore braking is by means of a coaster brake. Peddle forward and the trike moves, stop peddling and the trike coasts, peddle backwards and you brake/stop(hopefully). It does appear as though you could put brakes on the front basket.

Finally: the driving sprocket is quite small which means you will put a lot of power to the driven sprocket, but you will be spinning a lot more for each mile ridden. The number of turns of the driven sprocket and therefore the wheel, is – number of teeth on the driving sprocket divided by the number of teeth on the driven sprocket. Driving sprocket, 36 teeth, driven sprocket 12 teeth would yield, one full turn of the crank gets three turns of the wheel.

If I were to acquire this trike I would add brakes on the front wheels and reshape the handlebars for a more comfortable fit.



Jan Carter said:

Good observations.  Too much math for this old geezer.  Think I'll stick with my sulky idea - much less math, and sprockets. Hahahaha.  However, you bring up an important point for my sulky idea - needs brakes.  500 lbs of cargo will be pushing you down a hill with more force than two legs can stand; without brakes.  Again, too much math for me to figger, but puttin on some brakes eliminates the need for math.

James Cole said:

Some observations on the Cargo Trike that Jan posted.

First: looking at the handlebars; there is no shift lever, therefore this is a single speed rig.

Second: again looking at the handlebars; there is no brake lever, therefore braking is by means of a coaster brake. Peddle forward and the trike moves, stop peddling and the trike coasts, peddle backwards and you brake/stop(hopefully). It does appear as though you could put brakes on the front basket.

Finally: the driving sprocket is quite small which means you will put a lot of power to the driven sprocket, but you will be spinning a lot more for each mile ridden. The number of turns of the driven sprocket and therefore the wheel, is – number of teeth on the driving sprocket divided by the number of teeth on the driven sprocket. Driving sprocket, 36 teeth, driven sprocket 12 teeth would yield, one full turn of the crank gets three turns of the wheel.

If I were to acquire this trike I would add brakes on the front wheels and reshape the handlebars for a more comfortable fit.



Jan Carter said:

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