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I won this knife at an auction recently . It needs some cleaning up . Would like to hear some of y'alls techniques or suggestions . Thanks

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That's a nice looking older Buck. Here's a link that will help you determine the year of production: Buck Date Codes

From what I can see, yours appears to have been made between 72 and 86? That's when they started adding the model number to the tang stamp.

Overall your knife looks like it's in pretty good shape. It just needs some love. I'd start by giving it a bath with some warm soapy water. Scrub it down with a sponge or a dish rag. Chances are that most of the crud will come right off. Rinse it off real good and then towel dry it. I use canned air - "Dust Off" - to blow dry the pivot and back spring.

Now grab the oil and apply a liberal dose to the blade, wiping it down thoroughly with a soft rag. Old tee shirts are your friend when it comes to cleaning knives. There are any number of good knife-specific oils you can use. But good ol' 3 in ! oil works well in a pinch. Oil the pivot pin and run a line of oil along the back spring too. Work the blade back and forth several times to ensure that it's moving easily and that the oil you applied to the back sping is working its way in between the steel spring and the brass liners. That will serve to lubricate as well as force out any moisture left over from the bath you gave your knife. 

The "Dust Of" f that I mentioned earlier is one of the most useful items that I use when cleaning up old knives because you can use it to blow out any excess oil or water. Once I've blown any excess oil from the pivot and back spring I would wipe the entire knife down with a soft dry cotton cloth. The knife should be starting to look pretty good about now?

This is where my secret weapon comes into play. To magically transform those tarnished brass bolsters, I discovered the "Sunshine Polishing Cloth," a few years ago. It's a polishing cloth that has been impregnated with a dry powdered abrasive. And trust me when I tell you, they really do work like magic! Here's a short video that shows one in action...

I don't work for or have any investment in the company shown in the video above. I'm only using it to show you the Sunshine Polishing Cloth. I started buying these over 10 years ago at a local jewelry store and was blown away by the results. I buy them in bulk now from various sites online. I swear by them! Of course, you can always use Brasso. But Brasso can be messy and oftentimes leaves residue in hard to reach places. 

Once the bolsters have been cleaned and polished, and the blade has also been oiled and cleaned, your knife should now be showing the fruits of your labor. It should be gleaming in its appreciation for the love you've shown it. All you need to do now is wipe it down from head to toe with a nice soft cotton cloth. 

Over the years I have cleaned scores of knives. And in that time, I have accumulated any number of polishing cloths that were specially designed to clean and polish expensive jewelry. Once a Buck 110 or 112 Folding Hunter has been thoroughly cleaned and properly oiled, in my eyes, they become like knife jewelry that deserves the loving caress of a soft polishing cloth. And now I'm talking about a different type of polishing cloth - different than the Sunshine cloth. But, for your purpose now, an old tee shirt will work. Hint: Google is your friend when it comes to finding a good polishing cloth.

Okay. I've rambled on way too long. These are just some suggestions that have worked for me. Here's a picture that will illustrate the results of what I have attempted to describe. I'm sure that others will have some good suggestions, as well...

 These knives above were both older Buck knives that I won in auctions and cleaned up. I'll be anxious to see some pics of your knife once you've showered it with love. Cheers, my friend!

Hello Mr Ron Cooper , I want you know how much I appreciate you taking the time out of your day to view and respond to this discussion. Thank you sir ! 

 I've used knives all my life for fishing and hunting and always have a pocket knife for work or outdoors . These knives I've learned early to take care of early in life. I've never had to restore a knife till recently I been picking up a few at the local goodwill auctions.  Just seeing the knives you posted that you've restored has got me excited and I hope I can to the same justice for this knife . Again Thanks for sharing your knowledge and pointing me in the right direction . 



  • Ron Cooper said:

That's a nice looking older Buck. Here's a link that will help you determine the year of production: Buck Date Codes

From what I can see, yours appears to have been made between 72 and 86? That's when they started adding the model number to the tang stamp.

Overall your knife looks like it's in pretty good shape. It just needs some love. I'd start by giving it a bath with some warm soapy water. Scrub it down with a sponge or a dish rag. Chances are that most of the crud will come right off. Rinse it off real good and then towel dry it. I use canned air - "Dust Off" - to blow dry the pivot and back spring.

Now grab the oil and apply a liberal dose to the blade, wiping it down thoroughly with a soft rag. Old tee shirts are your friend when it comes to cleaning knives. There are any number of good knife-specific oils you can use. But good ol' 3 in ! oil works well in a pinch. Oil the pivot pin and run a line of oil along the back spring too. Work the blade back and forth several times to ensure that it's moving easily and that the oil you applied to the back sping is working its way in between the steel spring and the brass liners. That will serve to lubricate as well as force out any moisture left over from the bath you gave your knife. 

The "Dust Of" f that I mentioned earlier is one of the most useful items that I use when cleaning up old knives because you can use it to blow out any excess oil or water. Once I've blown any excess oil from the pivot and back spring I would wipe the entire knife down with a soft dry cotton cloth. The knife should be starting to look pretty good about now?

This is where my secret weapon comes into play. To magically transform those tarnished brass bolsters, I discovered the "Sunshine Polishing Cloth," a few years ago. It's a polishing cloth that has been impregnated with a dry powdered abrasive. And trust me when I tell you, they really do work like magic! Here's a short video that shows one in action...

I don't work for or have any investment in the company shown in the video above. I'm only using it to show you the Sunshine Polishing Cloth. I started buying these over 10 years ago at a local jewelry store and was blown away by the results. I buy them in bulk now from various sites online. I swear by them! Of course, you can always use Brasso. But Brasso can be messy and oftentimes leaves residue in hard to reach places. 

Once the bolsters have been cleaned and polished, and the blade has also been oiled and cleaned, your knife should now be showing the fruits of your labor. It should be gleaming in its appreciation for the love you've shown it. All you need to do now is wipe it down from head to toe with a nice soft cotton cloth. 

Over the years I have cleaned scores of knives. And in that time, I have accumulated any number of polishing cloths that were specially designed to clean and polish expensive jewelry. Once a Buck 110 or 112 Folding Hunter has been thoroughly cleaned and properly oiled, in my eyes, they become like knife jewelry that deserves the loving caress of a soft polishing cloth. And now I'm talking about a different type of polishing cloth - different than the Sunshine cloth. But, for your purpose now, an old tee shirt will work. Hint: Google is your friend when it comes to finding a good polishing cloth.

Okay. I've rambled on way too long. These are just some suggestions that have worked for me. Here's a picture that will illustrate the results of what I have attempted to describe. I'm sure that others will have some good suggestions, as well...

 These knives above were both older Buck knives that I won in auctions and cleaned up. I'll be anxious to see some pics of your knife once you've showered it with love. Cheers, my friend!

Hello Marvin, I dont know if you own another Buck 110 or this is your first, but you now have a Great , extremely durable , old knife ! There are a million and one ways to make it look and feel new again , as Ron said , a good soap and water bath to start , then I use my Dremel with a mild polishing compound to polish of the crud and mild scratches. Brasso works really good on the brass bolsters btw. Then a dose of Seal 1 to finish it off. I find mine at Collectorsknives.net , it is a real good lube and finisher . If you cut some strips out of an old shirt or cotton material you will find it helps to scrub the joints and the whole knife for that matter. If you have a rubber jawed vise, or put some material on your metal vise jaws ( so it doesnt scarch your knife ) and hold the knife while you ( buff it ) using the strips kinda like polishing a shoe. you can get it all shiny like new with some elbow grease. ( Although if you have a Dremel tool, it sure makes it a lot easier ! Good luck ! and have Have Fun !

An excellent find and score!

Your knife is pre-1972. No dots on the tang stamp, that I can see.
The two small cover/scale pins makes it pre-1977/1978, if memory serves, since Buck went to 3 cover/scale pins around 1978 or 1979. (The rocker/lock bar pin does not count)
Blade is 440C

You can send it to Buck for a SPA treatment. I think it is under $10, includes sharpening, and it will come back looking like new.
For the sharpening, you'll have your choice of "period correct" (original edge geometry) or "Edge 2000" the edge geometry used since 2000.
If it was me, I'd go with the Edge 2000. Buck knives were a major regal royal pain in the sitter to sharpen in the 60's and 70's.

Hello Jeff , Thank you Sir for your time and advice . This is the only 110 I have owned . I have a newer Buck 3 blade pocket knife . Old t-shirts I have a plenty of. I don't have a Dremel but have been looking to get one now I got a little more added incentitive . The wood has some very  light scratches on one side , the bolsters look pretty good other than the tarnishing . Overall I'm surprised at how solid and tight the lock and hinge is on this old of a knife. Also the blade looks new other than being stained not sure if it's some type of corrosion or what. Think the Dremel will come in handy to get it back to its original shine.    Thanks Jeff for the advice ,  Marvin

jeff said:

Hello Marvin, I dont know if you own another Buck 110 or this is your first, but you now have a Great , extremely durable , old knife ! There are a million and one ways to make it look and feel new again , as Ron said , a good soap and water bath to start , then I use my Dremel with a mild polishing compound to polish of the crud and mild scratches. Brasso works really good on the brass bolsters btw. Then a dose of Seal 1 to finish it off. I find mine at Collectorsknives.net , it is a real good lube and finisher . If you cut some strips out of an old shirt or cotton material you will find it helps to scrub the joints and the whole knife for that matter. If you have a rubber jawed vise, or put some material on your metal vise jaws ( so it doesnt scarch your knife ) and hold the knife while you ( buff it ) using the strips kinda like polishing a shoe. you can get it all shiny like new with some elbow grease. ( Although if you have a Dremel tool, it sure makes it a lot easier ! Good luck ! and have Have Fun !

Hello Steve , Thank you for join in the discussion Sir. $10 is a good deal I will have to consider that's cheaper than the supplies I would need to buy to do it myself . I've never restored one and I have time (if Good Lord willing) , I'm leaning toward trying it myself this time .

I'm not sure of the date , Bucks site states that the model # was added in 72 . 

I got this knife at a auction at local goodwill store for a bid $ 41 Dollars . Come away with this knife , a stag handled twin knife set in a sheath and some old fishing reels with few other items . So I think I got a pretty good deal. 

I started a discussion on the hunting knives but didn't get no replies . Maybe I need to put in a hunting knife specific group. 

Here's a close up of the tang of that helps age it .  Thanks Steve ,    Marvin

  
 
Steve said:

An excellent find and score!

Your knife is pre-1972. No dots on the tang stamp, that I can see.
The two small cover/scale pins makes it pre-1977/1978, if memory serves, since Buck went to 3 cover/scale pins around 1978 or 1979. (The rocker/lock bar pin does not count)
Blade is 440C

You can send it to Buck for a SPA treatment. I think it is under $10, includes sharpening, and it will come back looking like new.
For the sharpening, you'll have your choice of "period correct" (original edge geometry) or "Edge 2000" the edge geometry used since 2000.
If it was me, I'd go with the Edge 2000. Buck knives were a major regal royal pain in the sitter to sharpen in the 60's and 70's.

Here's the "Horse's Mouth" on the subject of Buck Date Codes...

Marvin,

From what I can see you have a really nice older 110. The blade looks full and the bolsters appear to be in good shape. Every blemish on your knife has a remedy. Whether it's polishing the brass bolsters that have tarnished or smoothing out the scratches on the wood scales. Brasso and sandpaper quickly come to mind. Cleaning and sharpening that tired looking blade? They make products and tools that can accomplish those tasks, as well.

For me, engaging in the process of cleaning up an old knife and restoring it to as close to its original condition as humanly possible is the very essence of why I collect knives. For me, that's the fun of this hobby! And that's also how I began to learn a few of the tricks that give the best results. 

Everybody's mileage varies. I can only give you my experience. For me, knife collecting, like life, is not so much about the destination as it is about the journey. It's about learning through doing, acquiring knowledge along the way. 

Bon voyage, my friend. Find your own path and enjoy the places it takes you! 

Looks like '67 to '72 for when it was made.
You can use Brasso or Mag polish on the bolsters and blade.
Put some masking tape on the wood covers to protect it from the Brasso.
To clean the wood, I'd try a non-gel toothpaste, on an old (or new) toothbrush, first.
How is the lockup? Is there any blade wiggle/wobble or rock when it is open?
If there is, send it to Buck. It is still under warranty, and they will take care of it, for the cost of postage.

I think you might be overlooking the addition of the model number on Marvin's knife, Steve?

Steve said:

Looks like '67 to '72 for when it was made.
You can use Brasso or Mag polish on the bolsters and blade.
Put some masking tape on the wood covers to protect it from the Brasso.
To clean the wood, I'd try a non-gel toothpaste, on an old (or new) toothbrush, first.
How is the lockup? Is there any blade wiggle/wobble or rock when it is open?
If there is, send it to Buck. It is still under warranty, and they will take care of it, for the cost of postage.

Steve , I was surprised at how solid the knife seems for an old knife .  The blade opens and closes and locks in place with no wiggle at all . To me it looks like it was put up new. My pics are not to clear but the blade edge looks like it just came from factory. I can't tell that it has been used or been put to a whetstone. I'm going to try the Brasso on the bolsters and blade . I hadn't heard of the toothpaste trick for the wood , I'll give it a try . Thanks for the tips Steve and have a gd weekend . 

  Marvin


Steve said:

Looks like '67 to '72 for when it was made.
You can use Brasso or Mag polish on the bolsters and blade.
Put some masking tape on the wood covers to protect it from the Brasso.
To clean the wood, I'd try a non-gel toothpaste, on an old (or new) toothbrush, first.
How is the lockup? Is there any blade wiggle/wobble or rock when it is open?
If there is, send it to Buck. It is still under warranty, and they will take care of it, for the cost of postage.

Ron also if you notice on my knife the wood scales have 2 brass pins and 1 stainless pin. I read the opinion of one collector that believes this dates these knives in the 74-75 years. 

Have a gd weekend ,

Marvin

Ron Cooper said:

I think you might be overlooking the addition of the model number on Marvin's knife, Steve?

Steve said:

Looks like '67 to '72 for when it was made.
You can use Brasso or Mag polish on the bolsters and blade.
Put some masking tape on the wood covers to protect it from the Brasso.
To clean the wood, I'd try a non-gel toothpaste, on an old (or new) toothbrush, first.
How is the lockup? Is there any blade wiggle/wobble or rock when it is open?
If there is, send it to Buck. It is still under warranty, and they will take care of it, for the cost of postage.

Good morning Marvin, that sounds great ! I carried a 110 for many years and put through a lot of abuse and its blade stayed amazingly tight ! They are very solid knives .  As far as the Dremel tool , well , I don't believe you can go wrong .I use mine for everything ! Start out with a felt polishing pad and a light compound , for your knife here ... should do the trick . As far as the wood slabs , as Ron said , toothpaste and a Dremel felt pad and see where it goes. There are a lot of good ideas as far as what to use on what . Everyone seems to have a preference. I am sure you will find yours too ! ;-) Dremel also makes many different polishing and cleaning , sanding , grinding options that you can check out. Many of which are very useful for cleaning and restoring  old, neglected knives and guns. Have Fun !

Marvin said:

Hello Jeff , Thank you Sir for your time and advice . This is the only 110 I have owned . I have a newer Buck 3 blade pocket knife . Old t-shirts I have a plenty of. I don't have a Dremel but have been looking to get one now I got a little more added incentitive . The wood has some very  light scratches on one side , the bolsters look pretty good other than the tarnishing . Overall I'm surprised at how solid and tight the lock and hinge is on this old of a knife. Also the blade looks new other than being stained not sure if it's some type of corrosion or what. Think the Dremel will come in handy to get it back to its original shine.    Thanks Jeff for the advice ,  Marvin

jeff said:

Hello Marvin, I dont know if you own another Buck 110 or this is your first, but you now have a Great , extremely durable , old knife ! There are a million and one ways to make it look and feel new again , as Ron said , a good soap and water bath to start , then I use my Dremel with a mild polishing compound to polish of the crud and mild scratches. Brasso works really good on the brass bolsters btw. Then a dose of Seal 1 to finish it off. I find mine at Collectorsknives.net , it is a real good lube and finisher . If you cut some strips out of an old shirt or cotton material you will find it helps to scrub the joints and the whole knife for that matter. If you have a rubber jawed vise, or put some material on your metal vise jaws ( so it doesnt scarch your knife ) and hold the knife while you ( buff it ) using the strips kinda like polishing a shoe. you can get it all shiny like new with some elbow grease. ( Although if you have a Dremel tool, it sure makes it a lot easier ! Good luck ! and have Have Fun !

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