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As a maker I am always interested in finding a better way to do something that will make it a little easier to make the components that go into a knife: Blade, guard, ferrule, pommel, handle, fit and finish, hand sanding, grinding, file work etc. I have made several tools in order to make the process a little easier. Since  this is a maker group, I'm sure there are many who have methods and tips that would be benificial to all. Please feel free to share them with the group. I will try to post some tips in the days ahead. J. R.

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The hand sanding device looks like a very useful tool

 


Good share JR. I have a drawer full of "broaches" made from various broken and discarded saw blades - fat/skinny, long/short, fine/coarse, etc. All have their purpose and all get used. Did the same with a lot of worn files that the edges were still sharp as well. My Dad used to say "Don't throw that away! You're gonna need it." (now I can't find the stuff I saved under all the stuff I saved....).

Got all kinds of sanding blocks/sticks/drawfiles as well. Really don't mind the hand sanding/finishing. Hate fitting guards though.
J. R. Reeves said:

Brooching Tool


WOW, the information in here is GREAT!

Awesome tips... Think I'll be making some new tools of the trade.  Thanks !

Oz,

Glad the guys have been able to share all this.  It certainly makes it easier for someone to visualize what they need to do to make a tool

Great information.  I'm getting ready to do my first 2 hidden tang knives.  I had considered just using my dremel "drill press" stand and run the handle under it like on a mill.  Will be working with Camel or Bovine bone, hadn't got the material yet.

Always have several old sawblades laying around that wind up as broaches eventually. Actually those old junked handsaws are easy to convert as well and you can make any length you might need. Make up a few with the teeth working on "draw" and a few working on "push". Got a drawer full of them all sizes.

Being a bladesmith, I have made/forged up a lot of specialty tools for making knives. Pretty normal thing for smiths. One that is handy is the "Monkey Tool" - semi flattened heavy wall pipe with a striking cap on the end, to hot set guards on hidden tang blades. Amazingly easy to make and very useful. I have several in various sizes and shapes. Will take pics when I get a chance.

J. R. Reeves said:

When making a hidden tang knife, many times one has to remove material from the inside of a knife handle. I have labored doing this for years . I've made a tool that has helped me speed up the process. It really works great and one can remove alot of material quickly. It works well on stag tapers and also wood handles. I bought a couple of reciprecating saw blades and ground the backs down to make them a little smaller. I then took a nut driver and brazed the blades down in the socket side by side. I super glued the blades together on their sides. If you are not careful you will remove too much material out of the inside of your handle. They cut quick and really work better than anything I've ever tried to use.

Pic in the process please? Camel finishes so much nicer in my eyes

Andy Larrison said:

Great information.  I'm getting ready to do my first 2 hidden tang knives.  I had considered just using my dremel "drill press" stand and run the handle under it like on a mill.  Will be working with Camel or Bovine bone, hadn't got the material yet.

I nearly forgot about this...LOL....I just received the camel bone the other day and plan to work on this soon.  I'll be sure and share some pictures of how it happens.

I agree, camel bone cleans up quite nicely.

Wow....so I really procastinated on this project.  I was able to finish it and hand deliver it a couple weeks ago.  What I ended up using was an improvised milling machine which consisted of my small drill press and an inexpensive 2 axis vise that I clamped to the drill press.  Here are a couple of pictures of how I had it set up.  I definitely learned some lessons while doing this, 1 is .....get a better clamping devise for my vise  LOL.  My friend was pleased with the end product and I got a new drill press and vise in the process.

Just a note on precaution Andy. Be careful to make sure you don't apply too much lateral feed pressure. Spindle bearings in all but the most robust drill presses are not designed to handle lateral stress. Camel bone probably cuts "easy" enough but it is tempting to mill slots in soft metals which take a bit more aggressive lateral pressure. That's one reason why there is a difference between drill presses and milling machines. One can ruin a decent little tabletop press pretty quick. I do have a cross feed vise on two of my DP's but have learned their limits when paired up.

I'm just going to say I didn't read that in a book and leave it at that.

Thanks Carl!  Makes sense to me what you're saying....read in a book or not...LOL.  Not something I will do very often, but I can say I've done it and can do it again if needed.

Carl Rechsteiner said:

Just a note on precaution Andy. Be careful to make sure you don't apply too much lateral feed pressure. Spindle bearings in all but the most robust drill presses are not designed to handle lateral stress. Camel bone probably cuts "easy" enough but it is tempting to mill slots in soft metals which take a bit more aggressive lateral pressure. That's one reason why there is a difference between drill presses and milling machines. One can ruin a decent little tabletop press pretty quick. I do have a cross feed vise on two of my DP's but have learned their limits when paired up.

I'm just going to say I didn't read that in a book and leave it at that.

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