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   Kaylin and I went to the Charlotte Woodcarvers Club, annual show, this past weekend, and I was fortunate to see Robert Stadtlander, from Stadtlander Woodcarvings.  I was hoping to find an OarCarver at the show, and Stadtlander is THE source, for this and other Oar Carvers as well as a couple of other Queen patterns.

http://www.goestores.com/storename/stadtlandercarvings/ViewDept-265... 

   I opted for the "Single Locker" version.

   As seen in the enclosed paperwork, They offer the knife either with the factory edge, or sharpened to a carving edge (basically flat ground). 

   I chose the factory edge because I prefer a more robust edge, for carving my peach pits. The pre sharpened edges would be perfect for other carvings and general detail work.

   Basically, this Oar Carver is a modified Queen Cutlery #41-L, Locking Copperhead with a modified blade.  3 3/4", closed, with a 1 1/2' blade.

They are offered in American Walnut, Zebra Wood, Smooth Black Cherry, Aged Honey Amber Stag Bone and Abalone.  While the smooth wood/bone/Abalone knives feel great in hand, I bought the Honey Amber Stag.  (Guess that's the collector in me coming out).

http://www.goestores.com/storename/stadtlandercarvings/ViewDept-272...

   Fit and finish it typically Queen, and provides great pleasure to hold.

   Functionally, care needs to be taken with opening the blade.  The nail pull is very shallow, (which is my primary complaint with all the Queen knives that I own). 

   There is a substantial half stop, and the liner lock is not so prominent as to cause irritation when in use.

   The modified D-2, Queen Steel blade looks to be well suited to its task of detail carving.

   All in all, this version of the Oar Carver, should be a welcome addition to my carving kit.

Tags: Carver, Oar, Queen, Stadtlander

Views: 5451

Replies to This Discussion

Great recommendation JJ Smith III.  

The Henckel's 4 blade Congress is a fine knife and with appropriate modifications will serve your well

I purchased a modified version from Golden Fingers Knives around 1997. The steel and fittings were excellent and the knife never loosened up. Plus I had 4 blades. Used it as my primary carving knife for  several years. Bought a new Henckel's Congress and found the fitting wasn't as tight. Very easy pull. Working on the modifications as I go. Golden Fingers' thinned and re profiled the blades.

Boker had/has what they called the Carver's congress, designed by a fellow that carved decoys, I believe.

I've modified several Rough Rider single blade folders with really good results.  

The Boker Carver's Congress is still made!

Boker 115465 Carver's Congress Whittler Pocket Knife, Rosewood. 
  • 1095 Carbon steel blades
  • Includes sheepfoot, pen, coping and spey blades
  • Made in Solingen, Germany with a Rosewood handle
  • Closed length: 3 3/4-inch



J.J. Smith III said:

Boker had/has what they called the Carver's congress, designed by a fellow that carved decoys, I believe.

I've modified several Rough Rider single blade folders with really good results.  

Lewis & J.J.,

Thank you both for your responses. I've been alternating between an old Heinr. Boker congress that I picked up used who's former owner was either a whittler or a grinder saleman. The steel on that thing seems to bite and sharpen better than anything I've found yet. It started getting a little looser so I have opted for a couple of Flexcut knives that I have and also a Tidioute Courthouse Whittler and a Tidioute #25 frame barlow/jack with a wharncliffe main blade and a clip secondary. I also have a few others I use as needed - an old Ulster preWWII stockman and a couple of old Schrade Waldens. Might have to pick up one or two of those specialty blades off of Stadtlander's site (which is awesome btw) to get in those especially hard to reach areas. Working on a chain out of black & white ebony (my 3rd or 4th out of ebony) now - learning that shorter blades make shallower cuts - in my hands, lol. Gotten a bit out of practice I guess - live and learn....I may have to give the Boker's Carver Congress and/or the Rough Rider mod a try. Something about grinding down a brand new blade bugs me though - will have to keep thinking that the blade will be safer in a shorter form. Might have to invest in a thumb protector! Thanks again gentlemen!



Tom Peterson said:

Lewis & J.J.,

Thank you both for your responses. I've been alternating between an old Heinr. Boker congress that I picked up used who's former owner was either a whittler or a grinder saleman. The steel on that thing seems to bite and sharpen better than anything I've found yet. It started getting a little looser so I have opted for a couple of Flexcut knives that I have and also a Tidioute Courthouse Whittler and a Tidioute #25 frame barlow/jack with a wharncliffe main blade and a clip secondary. I also have a few others I use as needed - an old Ulster preWWII stockman and a couple of old Schrade Waldens. Might have to pick up one or two of those specialty blades off of Stadtlander's site (which is awesome btw) to get in those especially hard to reach areas. Working on a chain out of black & white ebony (my 3rd or 4th out of ebony) now - learning that shorter blades make shallower cuts - in my hands, lol. Gotten a bit out of practice I guess - live and learn....I may have to give the Boker's Carver Congress and/or the Rough Rider mod a try. Something about grinding down a brand new blade bugs me though - will have to keep thinking that the blade will be safer in a shorter form. Might have to invest in a thumb protector! Thanks again gentlemen!

Tom I had to laugh at 'shorter blades make shallower cut-in my hands'. I'm afraid that I have helped the band aid industry in my whittling efforts. But they all seem to heal and I can still count to 10 so I persevere. 

Floyd, yessir, it took me a bit to learn but I now endorse short blades! I've had 2-3 "matrix moments" where I was sure that I cut myself only to look and find no damage. Do have a few paper cuts where the blade just barely got me. Learned not to wear my earbuds listening to music while using my Dremel w/ sanding barrel bits. I was working on a black ebony chain and all of a sudden had this white dust - didn't have to trim my thumbnail for a week or so. Still have all ten digits myself but they keep getting a hair shorter, lol....Still beats yardwork!
 
Floyd Jester said:



Tom Peterson said:

Lewis & J.J.,

Thank you both for your responses. I've been alternating between an old Heinr. Boker congress that I picked up used who's former owner was either a whittler or a grinder saleman. The steel on that thing seems to bite and sharpen better than anything I've found yet. It started getting a little looser so I have opted for a couple of Flexcut knives that I have and also a Tidioute Courthouse Whittler and a Tidioute #25 frame barlow/jack with a wharncliffe main blade and a clip secondary. I also have a few others I use as needed - an old Ulster preWWII stockman and a couple of old Schrade Waldens. Might have to pick up one or two of those specialty blades off of Stadtlander's site (which is awesome btw) to get in those especially hard to reach areas. Working on a chain out of black & white ebony (my 3rd or 4th out of ebony) now - learning that shorter blades make shallower cuts - in my hands, lol. Gotten a bit out of practice I guess - live and learn....I may have to give the Boker's Carver Congress and/or the Rough Rider mod a try. Something about grinding down a brand new blade bugs me though - will have to keep thinking that the blade will be safer in a shorter form. Might have to invest in a thumb protector! Thanks again gentlemen!

Tom I had to laugh at 'shorter blades make shallower cut-in my hands'. I'm afraid that I have helped the band aid industry in my whittling efforts. But they all seem to heal and I can still count to 10 so I persevere. 

Tom Peterson said..

"Something about grinding down a brand new blade bugs me though"

You'll seldom find a traditional frame pocket knife that has the specific blades that you want.    The Barlow with a wharncliffe and small clip(or pin) may be an exception.

I think it's funny when folks buy a used knife and complain about the previous owner grinding down a blade or 2.  I look at it and say that the previous owner may have been a carver, and simply reprofiled the blades to suit his needs.

If you do start reprofiling, do start on something inexpensive.  It's addictive, but you'll have something that really fits you and your style.

Please excuse, wrong place

J.J.

I appreciated your posts and link to the carver's blog and supplies. I'm still looking for more knives that are a good fit for what I do. Have looked at some el cheapo knives for modding and some ready made customs. I'm on a budget but already have about 40+ knives in one state of production or another so I'm not sure I want to add another to the list. May just opt to add a couple more Flexcut knives to my collection or something else that fits the immediate need. Been looking at the mini pelican and maybe a hook knife and a detail skew. I do mainly spoons and wooden chains. Started doing chains out of exotics. The wood was so pretty that it led me to polish a few of them, which kind of defeated the whole hand whittled effect but chains made of cocobolo, ziricote, kingwood, tulipwood, ebony, etc cleaned up so nicely the wood seemed to beg to get it's shine on, lol.

You know, Tom, I'm just a poor old white guy.  (Emphasis on poor and old).  I've seen folks carry around specially designed boxes and bucket's holding literally dozens of knives, each.

Being able to keep a kit that holds what you need can be difficult and expensive.  Guess I'm lucky, I'm not in to much more than simple whittling.

I like the ability to have all the tools I need as well as a project on hand and be able to carry it in a pocket.

Speaking of which, I've got a monkey to carve, for my grandson.  Christmas is upon us.

J.J.,

Right there with you on the poor and old. Wasn't trying to sound fancy by any means, but rather just a bit lazy. Started thinking momentarily that since I like the shorter varieties of whittling knives (for safety) that I could probably make one out of scrap 1095 or 440c stainless that I had sitting around - then I remembered all of my unfinished fixed blade projects and gave it some more thought. I don't have 1 knife that does it all yet but between 2 Flexcut knives, my old Boker congress that was modded I do most of what I need to do. I grab a few other knives if they're handy and sharp but do most of my carving at home so it's not as critical to be mobile. I kind of stumbled upon the other varieties of wood. The guy at the store tried to steer me away from hardwoods - however, I like a challenge and the wood is a bit more forgiving sometimes, smaller curls too. Sure do learn a few life lessons while whittling...lol. Back to my chain....

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