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So, you got a Stockman, wanna show it off? Here is your chance. even though you probably have the picture in your albums, post it here! You can either add an image to your comment by clicking on the camera icon, or you can attach a file, either way we would like to see your stockman.

one rule though.... it has to be a stockman!!!

Tags: fame, hall, of, pictures, stockman

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I like it!  Such as interesting handle.  And a well-defined "spear" master-blade ... my favorite!  (Nice background, too.)  One of these days I'd like to take photos as good as this one, but my on-camera built-in flash is way wrong.  Room light (multiple sources) throws colors in that I don't want & can't seem to filter out.

Thanks Donald!

And VERY nice Abalone!

Thought I'd share my latest stockman acquisition.  I've always liked the odd & unusual & that describes this big guy:  A Frost PRESIDENT'S KNIFE.  Length closed = 5".  Handles are picked "Rocky Mountain Autumn" bone.  All 3 blades are etched with a black background.

Primary: "(signature of Jim Frost) / (Frost Cutlery logo) / JIM FROST / PRESIDENT" with "FROST / GERMAN STAINLESS" on tang.  Secondary: "(signature of Kevin Pipes / (SMKW logo) / KEVIN PIPES / PRESIDENT" with "SMKW" on tang.  Third blade: "The President's Knife / 2004".

(To be continued ...)

(6 hrs later)  Anyway, not only is this a stockman sowbelly; it's a "cuttin horse"-style sowbelly.  That's immediately obvious as it has the "horse" swept-back blades design.  So what I want to know is where and when by-whom this style originated.  (I notice that S&W is using it as a theme for a line of non-"cuttin' horses".)  The typical knife is at least 3 1/2" - 4 1/2" long, handles stag, bone, & other, made in Germany (Boker, Hen & Rooster, Kissing Crane), and priced new at about $100, depending on size & handles.  And they usually have some kind of reverse primary blade etch that names them:  "Cuttin' Horse", "Master Cuttin' Horse", "Little Cuttin' Horse", & even "Master Quarter Horse".

So this is my new cuttin' horse knife, except it's called a "President's Knife" ...


Donald Lee Hargrove said:

Thought I'd share my latest stockman acquisition.  I've always liked the odd & unusual & that describes this big guy:  A Frost PRESIDENT'S KNIFE.  Length closed = 5".  Handles are picked "Rocky Mountain Autumn" bone.  All 3 blades are etched with a black background.

Primary: "(signature of Jim Frost) / (Frost Cutlery logo) / JIM FROST / PRESIDENT" with "FROST / GERMAN STAINLESS" on tang.  Secondary: "(signature of Kevin Pipes / (SMKW logo) / KEVIN PIPES / PRESIDENT" with "SMKW" on tang.  Third blade: "The President's Knife / 2004".

(To be continued ...)

Very very nice Donald.

Donald Lee Hargrove said:

(6 hrs later)  Anyway, not only is this a stockman sowbelly; it's a "cuttin horse"-style sowbelly.  That's immediately obvious as it has the "horse" swept-back blades design.  So what I want to know is where and when by-whom this style originated.  (I notice that S&W is using it as a theme for a line of non-"cuttin' horses".)  The typical knife is at least 3 1/2" - 4 1/2" long, handles stag, bone, & other, made in Germany (Boker, Hen & Rooster, Kissing Crane), and priced new at about $100, depending on size & handles.  And they usually have some kind of reverse primary blade etch that names them:  "Cuttin' Horse", "Master Cuttin' Horse", "Little Cuttin' Horse", & even "Master Quarter Horse".

So this is my new cuttin' horse knife, except it's called a "President's Knife" ...

Donald Lee Hargrove said:

Thought I'd share my latest stockman acquisition.  I've always liked the odd & unusual & that describes this big guy:  A Frost PRESIDENT'S KNIFE.  Length closed = 5".  Handles are picked "Rocky Mountain Autumn" bone.  All 3 blades are etched with a black background.

Primary: "(signature of Jim Frost) / (Frost Cutlery logo) / JIM FROST / PRESIDENT" with "FROST / GERMAN STAINLESS" on tang.  Secondary: "(signature of Kevin Pipes / (SMKW logo) / KEVIN PIPES / PRESIDENT" with "SMKW" on tang.  Third blade: "The President's Knife / 2004".

(To be continued ...)

HI, again!  I thought it might be interesting to compare the Hen & Rooster "President's Knife" with a standard-sized (3 3/4") "Quarter Horse".  This one with stag handles, fancy bolsters, & normal markings.  (See pix ...)

And a few misc facts on the subject:

Carl Bertram owned a poultry business in Solingen.  In 1845 he began hand-making his own line of cutlery.  He called it "Hen & Rooster" so that customers would know him!  In spite of the fine knives produced, the factory was shut down in 1980. 

The important thing to remember is that the pre-1980 knives are considered finer than the later ones and, therefore, are more expensive to acquire.  Marks?  The name of the brand they're made for, the maker "*Bertram*", & maybe a chicken or two. It varies.

On the other hand, if it says "Bertram Cutlery" it's post-1980 product.  Also check the Spey blade etch.  Not considered as good, these knives are priced cheaper, yet are still considered good cutlery.  Many of them are made by Klaas or Boker.  The current holder of the "Hen and Rooster" name is James Frost, of Frost Cutlery.

Some great facts and some just gorgeous knives Donald... thanks for sharing those!

Beautiful stag H&R!

HI, Stock Guys!  I promised Steve a look at a Katz stockman & here tis.  It's got a drop-point master blade, the steel is their XT-80 Japanese stainless, & the handles are blonde ash wood.  Closed length is 3 3/4".  This is my 3rd Katz knife & doesn't disappoint.  Ultimate F & F.

That sure is a pretty knife, Donald! I like the wood! Those fluted, dimpled bolsters sure do dress it up nice! I can see why you'd like it. I'm sure I would, too!

Donald, you have some very nice knives there, thanks for posting so we can see them.

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